Yesterday, the hashtag #BeingAsian trended on Twitter for a good portion of the night. The conversation revolved around Asian-American identity; many people share their stories, their experiences, and sought to break down many persistent misconceptions.

According to NBC Asian American, the hashtag was “first tweeted out by 17 year old Michael Tarui on Tuesday afternoon”, encouraging “Twitter users to describe “what it’s like #BeingAsian and the racism that comes with it.”

Still according to NBC Asian American who interviewed Tarui last night, the conversation was supposed to be focused on racism spreads into a general conversation about the Asian-American experience. “The tag was originally meant to discuss simply our experiences with racism, but because the tag was general we (the people in the group chat) decided that it would be okay to also use this tag to simply discuss what it is like being Asian – the racism, the culture, the pride, the shame, etc.”

#BeingAsian Breaks Stereotypes About The Asian American Identity

The #BeingAsian conversation is much needed as it breaks many stereotypes about the Asian-American identity. While only representing 6% of the total U.S. population, Asian Americans are the nation’s fastest growing population segment. They are also an extremely diverse communities composed of 40 different ethnicities. #BeingAsian truly provides an eye opening and compelling spotlight on a community too many times painted with a single brush.

The Asian American community used the #BeingAsian hashtag for…

DENOUNCING HURTFUL COMMON RACIST COMMENTS

SHARING STRUGGLES WITH BICULTURAL | MULTIRACIAL IDENTITIES

RE-EXPLAINING THE DIVERSITY OF ASIAN AMERICANS

EMPATHIZING WITH OTHER COMMUNITIES AFFECTED BY DISCRIMINATION

USING HUMOR TO POINT OUT OFFENSIVE CLICHES

A GREAT ADDITION TO #MYASIANAMERICANSTORY

This is not the first time that the Asian American youth bring the identity conversation to Twitter. Last year in August 24, 2015, then 15 year old Jason Fong created #MyAsianAmericanStory in response to Jed Bush’s controversial comment about anchor babies. As of September 17, 2015, the tag has been used over 20,000 times! 

The story has been trending so much that it was turned into a Twitter moment. But as rightfully stated by Christopher Kang, it is important to keep the conversation alive.